Volunteers restoring Waikuaaala

April 30, 2011 Long overgrown with non-native plants, the Waikuaaala pond at Kahaluu Beach Park is regaining its stature. Work to restore the brackish water pond, located near the center of the park, began shortly after a March 11 tsunami inundated the area. Since then, numerous people and groups, including a few county workers, have spent hours clearing out weeds, trees and rocks in an effort to expand the pond from the small 12-foot-by-12-foot circle it had become to a nearly 25-by-40 oval.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Big Island Green

April 13th, 2011  School Garden fosters Community and Sustainability By Roger Harris & Diane Koerner
Mala’ai: The Culinary Garden of Waimea Middle School shares the bounty of their school garden with students, families, faculty and the community too. Long a teaching force that combines the pleasure and excitement of working with the earth and growing food, the Mala’ai Saturday afternoon Crop Share gathers the abundance of their garden as well as surplus produce from nearby farms and offers them to the community.
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Used with permission from Big Island Weekly

Volunteers Brave Heat To Clean Up Beach

August 13, 2011 Clean up continues in Kailua Kona 5 months after the Tsunami swept through the islands. 

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Used with permission from KITV.com

Volunteers vital to tsunami cleanup efforts

March 17, 2011 Heavy equipment, tools and tenacity were prevalent Thursday in West Hawaii, where volunteers banded together with government employees to clean up tsunami debris. Hawaii Rocks and Pineapple Custom are helping the state Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation remove wreckage off Kailua Pier, as well as out of Kamakahonu and Kaiakeakua bays. Kamakahonu Bay fronts Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel while Kaiakeakua Bay is on the other side of the pier. The businesses began donating their time, equipment, labor and expertise Saturday. Their reason was simple.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

UH Hilo students participate in Ivy League

March 10, 2011 Three students from the master’s program in tropical conservation biology and environmental science at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo will go to Cornell University to complete their research as part of the “Cornell-Hawaiʻi Graduate Field Research Laboratory.” Ambyr Mokiao-Lee, Kainana Francisco, and Troy Sakihara joined a group of 14 Ph.D. students from Cornell’s tropical field ecology course in January to collect data for their projects on the wiliwili ecology and anchialine pond hydrology in West Hawaiʻi. They will spend two weeks in April at the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York, to prepare their data for publication.

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Used with permission from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

Cooperatives can help gardeners and farmers

March 6, 2011 by Melanie Bondera Though we all probably love spending time working solo in our gardens or on our farms, we usually arrive at a point where we realize we might benefit from a little support. Then it’s time to “hui up.” Working together can accomplish many goals. Maybe you want some organic gardening supplies that are too expensive to buy locally. Perhaps you’d love to be able to use a piece of equipment occasionally that you can’t afford to buy on your own.

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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Coastal Classroom Konawaena middle schoolers learn science in the field

February 18, 2011 Konawaena Middle School eighth-graders got a small taste of field work this week while spending time at Kahaluu Beach testing scientific theories. From determining the effects of nitrates and nitrites upon sea urchin diversity to discovering how sewage impacts marine life, students used an assortment of tests on collected water samples to see if their hypotheses proved true.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Pelekane watershed restoration project to finish on time, on budget

February 14, 2011 by Carolyn Lucas Environmental benefits is the focus of the $2.9 million Pelekane Bay Watershed Restoration Project, but Melora Purell also shed light on economic factors Sunday during the Kawaihae Local Resource Council’s monthly meeting. About 92 percent of this federal money was spent locally. It went toward purchasing soil, nursery and building supplies from Big Island businesses, as well as buying used four-wheel drive vehicles and generating business for mechanics who repaired those vehicles.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

In R.I. and Hawaii, institute trains leaders By Caroline Flanagan

February 14, 2011 From Rhode Island to Hawaii, high school students are learning environmental leadership through programs offered by the Brown Leadership Institute, a pre-college program that teaches high school students interested in global issues to take action in their own communities. In 2004, the Leadership Institute formed the Brown Environmental Leadership Lab, and has since partnered with a Hawaiian educational center, branching into the Pacific. Students enrolled in the Brown Environmental Leadership Laboratory program in Rhode Island spend two weeks living at the Haffenreffer Estate in Bristol, on the shores of the Narragansett Bay.
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Used with permission from the Brown Daily Herald

Laulima Center offers assistance for cooperatives

February 8, 2011 Groups across the state that would like to form a cooperative but need some assistance getting organized, writing a business plan, or becoming legally incorporated have a new resource—the Laulima Center. Established by The Kohala Center and funded by a USDA-Rural Cooperative Development grant and the Ulupono Initiative, the Laulima Center will serve all sectors of the rural economy by providing organizational support to cooperative ventures statewide.
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Used with permission from Hawaii 247