Fresh produce for low-income folks

October 27, 2011 The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently awarded nearly $165,000 to two West Hawaii nonprofits to support direct marketing efforts and increase access to fresh produce in low-income areas. Getting fruits and vegetables from six area farmers markets into the hands of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program recipients will get a little easier next year. A $90,460 grant to The Kohala Center will allow these customers to pay with electronic benefits transfer, or EBT, cards — the replacement for food stamps, said Melanie Bondera, rural cooperative development specialist for the Laulima Center, a program of The Kohala Center.
» read more

Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

South Kona: Seed exchange set for Nov. 5th

October 22, 2011 By David Corrigan and Stephanie Salazar Captain Cook, Hawaii: In South Kona, today we report on a West Hawaii Seed Exchange set for November 5th. According to the Kohala Center, Island farmers and gardeners who save seed are invited to attend the annual West Hawai‘i Seed Exchange from 2–4 p.m. Saturday, November 5, at the Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in Captain Cook. The exchange coincides with the garden’s annual Arbor Day Plant Give-Away. Farmers and gardeners are invited to bring saved seed, cuttings, huli, and corms of food crops that grow well in home gardens and on farms.

Click here to watch the video online.

Used with permission from Big Island Video News

Saving Seeds

October 13, 2011  by Joan Conrow  “I pretty much think saving seed is the most important thing we can do on the planet,” says Paul Massey, founder of Regenerations Botanical Garden in Kilauea. “We’re at a tipping point, where we still have an amazing amount of plant diversity, but it’s disappearing rapidly.” Massey will be one of the speakers at a two-day workshop aimed at teaching folks how to save seeds. The deadline to register, and apply for youth scholarships, is Thursday, Oct. 20.
» read more

Used with permission from For Kauai Online

Hawaii Island’s Best Beach for Snorkeling

September 23, 2011 By Kim Steutermann Rogers When I arrived at Hawaii Island’s number one snorkeling beach last week, the tide was low, revealing bright green seaweed growing on rocks. Exactly 77 beach-goers were out–reclining on beach towels, wading in the water, swimming and snorkeling. A dozen more sat at the picnic tables under the pavilion. Sean, a one-time public defender from California, manned the lifeguard tower, and two retired school teachers, Ken and Regan, set up shop for ReefTeach. On the back of Ken’s blue, volunteer-issue ReefTeach shirt, he’d handwritten in permanent marker: Please Kokua: No Touch Turtles!! No feed fish!! No touch coral!! *Mahalo*.
» read more

Used with permission from The Outrigger

Counting Crows

September 22, 2011  By Kim Steutermann Rogers I’m standing on one side of a window in the library of the Keauhou Bird Conservation Center. On the other side of the glass, two crows, a couple, go about their day. The male presents the back of his head to the female. She reaches over, opens her bill and plucks out a feather. He flinches but presents his head to her again, and she reaches, opens and plucks. It’s molting season, a prickly, itchy time for a bird. A little help snagging those feathers in hard to reach places is greatly appreciated.
» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from The Outrigger

Kamehameha Schools names three finalists for top job

September 19, 2011 Kamehameha Schools has narrowed down the search for a new head of school for the Kapalama campus to three finalists, officials announced in a news release today. They are: Lee Ann DeLima, currently the headmaster of Kamehameha Schools Maui campus. J. Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua, a professor of political science at UH-Manoa. Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua has helped to build UH’s indigenous politics program. She received a doctoral degree from the University of California, Santa Cruz.
» read more

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from the Star Advertiser

Kamehameha Schools names headmaster finalists

September 19, 2011 Kamehameha Schools on Monday named three finalists for headmaster of its Kapalama Campus. The Honolulu private school is searching for a successor for Michael Chun, who said in May that he would step down in July 2012. The finalists are: Lee Ann DeLima, headmaster of Kamehameha Schools’ Maui Campus; J. Noelani Goodyear-Kapua [sic], a political science professor at the University of Hawaii Manoa and Earl T. Kim, superintendent of the Montgomery School District in New Jersey.

Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Pacific Business News

The Story of “Lefty” the Sea Turtle

September 1, 2011 Share The Story of “Lefty” the Sea Turtle …By Margaret Kearns… Green sea turtles (honu in Hawaiian) are among Hawai‘i’s most popular, positively charming marine creatures. Revered by ancient Hawaiians, one legend tells the story of a mystical honu, Kauila, who resided in the waters off Hawai‘i Island. Kauila, as the legend goes, possessed special powers that allowed her to change into human form to watch over the village children playing near the shore.
» Read more

Used with permission from Ke Ola Magazine

Rebuilding Waikuaaala after Kona tsunami

August 15, 2011 KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii: The community gathered to lend a hand to the cherished Kahulu’u Beach Park on Saturday, part of the Kokua Kahulu’u effort organized by the Kohala Center, Hawaii County and supported by other local groups and businesses. The Wai’kua’a’ala pond, once the royal bath for Hawaiian alii, was restored by heavy lifting volunteers under the direction of Kelii Freitas, a county worker and stone mason versed in the old style. Organizers said the March 11th tsunami that battered the Kona coast presented an opportunity to refurbish the pond that had fallen under disrepair.

Click here to watch the video online.

Used with permission from Big Island Video News.com

From Punana Leo o Hilo to Oxford

August 13, 2011 By Peter Sur For anybody who has questioned the value of a Hawaiian immersion education, consider the case of ‘Oiwi Parker Jones. As members of Protect Kaho‘olawe Ohana, his activist parents met in a courtroom following a protest. Raised by his mother in Hilo, he entered the first class of Punana Leo o Hilo in 1985, and stayed with the program until he was 15. Now 30, Parker Jones is a junior faculty member at England’s University of Oxford, where he earned his PhD., and he was recently granted a prestigious $50,000 Mellon-Hawaii postdoctoral fellowship in linguistics.
» Read more

Used with permission from Hawaii Tribune Herald