Rebuilding Waikuaaala after Kona tsunami

August 15, 2011 KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii: The community gathered to lend a hand to the cherished Kahulu’u Beach Park on Saturday, part of the Kokua Kahulu’u effort organized by the Kohala Center, Hawaii County and supported by other local groups and businesses. The Wai’kua’a’ala pond, once the royal bath for Hawaiian alii, was restored by heavy lifting volunteers under the direction of Kelii Freitas, a county worker and stone mason versed in the old style. Organizers said the March 11th tsunami that battered the Kona coast presented an opportunity to refurbish the pond that had fallen under disrepair.

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Used with permission from Big Island Video News.com

From Punana Leo o Hilo to Oxford

August 13, 2011 By Peter Sur For anybody who has questioned the value of a Hawaiian immersion education, consider the case of ‘Oiwi Parker Jones. As members of Protect Kaho‘olawe Ohana, his activist parents met in a courtroom following a protest. Raised by his mother in Hilo, he entered the first class of Punana Leo o Hilo in 1985, and stayed with the program until he was 15. Now 30, Parker Jones is a junior faculty member at England’s University of Oxford, where he earned his PhD., and he was recently granted a prestigious $50,000 Mellon-Hawaii postdoctoral fellowship in linguistics.
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Used with permission from Hawaii Tribune Herald

UH Hilo’s Kimura awarded Mellon-Hawai‘i fellowship

July 27, 2011 – KAMUELA, Hawai‘i — University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (UH Hilo) assistant professor Larry Kimura has been selected as a 2011–2012 Mellon-Hawai‘i Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellow. Kimura is one of four scholars receiving the fellowships in recognition of their commitment to the advancement of scholarship on Hawaiian cultural and natural environments, Hawaiian language, history, politics, and society.

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Used with permission from the Hamakua Times

School garden conference at Makaha Elementary

July 11, 2011 MAKAHA—School garden and classroom teachers from around the state will converge this week at the oldest school garden in the state, Hoa ‘Aina O Makaha, for the 4th annual Summer School Garden Conference. The theme of this year’s conference is Planting Hope: Growing the Next Generation. The conference is hosted by The Kohala Center of the Big Island, an independent, not-for-profit center for research and education about and for the environment.

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Used with permission from The Hawaii Independant

Net Results Keiki Learn About Hawaiian Fishing Techniques at Summer Camp

July 8, 2011 At age 18, kahu and Hawaiian historian Danny Akaka Jr. learned how to throw net along the shoreline fronting Eva Parker Woods Cottage at Mauna Lani Resort. Everywhere Akaka looked, he saw rainbow-colored waves full of fish. It was the 1970s, a time when Akaka said he could throw net once, eyes closed, and still bring home plenty of fish for his family, friends and neighbors.

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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Rare Find in Kohala Volunteers seek to aid epiphyte plant presumed extinct

July 7, 2011 A voluntary coalition of private landowners and state land managers hopes to preserve and propagate a rare Hawaiian plant species presumed extinct until it was discovered last summer in a North Kohala upland forest. Kohala Watershed Partnership received in June a $7,550 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Recovery Branch for protection and restoration of oha wai, or Clermontia peleana singuliflora.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

From Farm to Fork – One possible solution to our local food system

June 8, 2011 by Melanie Bondera Mauka to Makai / Imagine: It’s Saturday morning. You take the kids and head down to your local farmers market to pick up your weekly box of fruits, vegetables, taro and sweet potatoes from your ahupuaa co-op. You were able to get add-ons of mahimahi, Island beef, eggs, milk, bread, ohelo berry jam, and Kona coffee to round out your meals for this week.
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Used with permission from Honolulu Weekly

‘Lefty’ the turtle flipping through life

May 3, 2011 by Caroline Neary One of the greatest things about ReefTeaching is getting acquainted with the Hawaiian green sea turtles that frequent Kahaluu Bay. Each day, ReefTeach volunteers educate visitors about the honu (sea turtles) we encounter as they are happily eating or basking. ReefTeachers have become so familiar with some of these turtles that we even refer to a few of them by name—‘Rocky’ and ‘Lucky’ are two well-loved visitors to the bay.

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Used with permission from Hawaii 247

Volunteers restoring Waikuaaala

April 30, 2011 Long overgrown with non-native plants, the Waikuaaala pond at Kahaluu Beach Park is regaining its stature. Work to restore the brackish water pond, located near the center of the park, began shortly after a March 11 tsunami inundated the area. Since then, numerous people and groups, including a few county workers, have spent hours clearing out weeds, trees and rocks in an effort to expand the pond from the small 12-foot-by-12-foot circle it had become to a nearly 25-by-40 oval.
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Used with permission from West Hawaii Today

Big Island Green

April 13th, 2011  School Garden fosters Community and Sustainability By Roger Harris & Diane Koerner
Mala’ai: The Culinary Garden of Waimea Middle School shares the bounty of their school garden with students, families, faculty and the community too. Long a teaching force that combines the pleasure and excitement of working with the earth and growing food, the Mala’ai Saturday afternoon Crop Share gathers the abundance of their garden as well as surplus produce from nearby farms and offers them to the community.
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Used with permission from Big Island Weekly