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Storied landscapes: An understanding of place defines this year’s Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival

April 26, 2015 (Honolulu Star-Advertiser)—(Excerpt) In a similar vein, Hawaiian-language newspapers and other documents published from 1835 to 1920 will be discussed in a panel at the festival. Panelists include Kamana Beamer, author of “No Makou ka Mana: Liberating the Nation,” recipient of the 2015 Samuel M. Kamakau Book of the Year Award from the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association. He is [president and chief executive officer] of Hawai‘i Island’s Kohala Center, whose mission includes environmental education and stewardship of such natural areas as the Puu Pili rainforest in Kohala.

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VIDEO: Dr. Kamanamaikalani Beamer — No Mākou Ka Mana: Liberating The Nation

April 23, 2015—Following the 2015 Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards, Dr. Kamanamaikalani Beamer sat down with the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association to talk about his latest book, No Mākou Ka Mana: Liberating The Nation, for which he won the Samuel M. Kamakau Award. His book explores the wisdom and creative political sophistication of Hawai‘i’s leaders.

Applications sought for doctoral and postdoctoral fellowship

January 21, 2015 (Big Island Now)—Applications are now being accepted for the Mellon-Hawai‘i Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. The program which began in 2008, is entering its eighth year. The Mellon-Hawai‘i Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program was first established for Native Hawaiian scholars early in their academic careers and others who are committed to the advancement of knowledge about the Hawaiian natural and cultural environment, Hawaiian history, politics, and society.
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Advancing kama‘āina intellectual leadership

October 2014 (Ka Wai Ola)—In 2008, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, in collaboration with Kamehameha Schools established the Mellon-Hawai‘i Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at The Kohala Center. The fellowship program is  designed for Native Hawaiian scholars early in their academic careers and for others who are committed to the advancement of knowledge about the Hawaiian natural and cultural environment, Hawaiian history, politics, and society.
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A Younger Value

A new anthology grapples with the big questions.

April 1, 2014 (Honolulu Magazine)—When Randall W. Roth’s The Price of Paradise came out in the early ‘90s, it was one othe first books to really focus on the harsh realities of life in Hawai‘i. Essays about the smoke and mirrors of Hawai‘i’s government spending, the ballooning population, the high cost of living, the claims of native Hawaiians and the challenges of rapid transit all put a new twist on the phrase, “Lucky we livHawai‘i.” And, although they’re now more than 20 years old, many essays read as if written today.
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Maui scholar earns fellowship for Hawaiian cultural advancement

August 8, 2012 (Maui News)—Kula resident Katrina-Ann R. Kapa‘anaokalaokeola Oliveira is one of three Native Hawaiian scholars who were recently awarded a Mellon-Hawai‘i Fellowship to advance their academic careers. Oliveira, who holds doctorate and master degrees in geography and a bachelor’s degree in Hawaiian language and Hawaiian studies, all from University of Hawaii at Manoa, received a $50,000 post-doctoral fellowship.
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Click here to view the article online.

Native Hawaiian scholars awarded Mellon-Hawaii fellowships

August 1, 2012 Three Native Hawaiian scholars were recently awarded Mellon-Hawaii Fellowships to advance their academic careers. Marie Alohalani Brown, doctoral candidate in English at University of Hawaii at Manoa (UH Manoa), and Kaipo Perez III, doctoral candidate in zoology with a focus in marine ecology at UH Manoa, received doctoral fellowships. Katrina-Ann R. Kapaanaokalāokeola Oliveira, Ph.D., Geography (2006), UH Manoa, received a postdoctoral fellowship. 
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Click here to view the article online.

Used with permission from Hawaii247

From Punana Leo o Hilo to Oxford

August 13, 2011 By Peter Sur For anybody who has questioned the value of a Hawaiian immersion education, consider the case of ‘Oiwi Parker Jones. As members of Protect Kaho‘olawe Ohana, his activist parents met in a courtroom following a protest. Raised by his mother in Hilo, he entered the first class of Punana Leo o Hilo in 1985, and stayed with the program until he was 15. Now 30, Parker Jones is a junior faculty member at England’s University of Oxford, where he earned his PhD., and he was recently granted a prestigious $50,000 Mellon-Hawaii postdoctoral fellowship in linguistics.
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Used with permission from Hawaii Tribune Herald